Children’s Books

We have books suitable for all ages from babies to young adults: pop-up books, colouring books, chapter books, books for teenagers, and more. Come in and have a look around. If we don’t have what you are looking for, we can order most books for delivery the next day.

Some of our favourites


November 2017

wolf duck mouse

The Wolf the Duck and the Mouse

by Mac Barnett, illus. by Jon Klassen

wolf kitchen

Finally somebody has written a book set chiefly in the belly of a wolf, an environment which is much as I had imagined it. Without giving anything away, you’ll already know that the fate of fictional wolves is rarely better than that of their real-world counterparts. Also I congratulate this book on containing the words “flagon” and “wraiths”.


September 2017

 

Chocolate Cake by Michael Rosen (illus. Kevin Waldron)

Chocolate Cake

The nocturnal nabbing of a spare bit of chocolate cake may seem like the perfect crime, especially when the execution has been planned down to the finest detail. What could possibly go wrong? Michael Rosen’s performances of this piece always go down a storm, and here it is ideally complemented by Kevin Waldron’s hilarious illustrations.



August 2017

Rapunzel by Bethan Woolvin

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What, no prince? Fairy tales are clearly getting a bit more realistic these days. Bethan Woolvin first grabbed our attention when she subverted the tale of Little Red Riding Hood – and now strikes again! Her fabulous illustrations perfectly complement a fresh and witty take on an old favourite. This is a damsel with attitude.

July 2017

 

Sleep Well, Siba & Saba
by Nansubuga Nagadya Isdahl and Sandra Van Doorn

Sleep-Well-Siba-and-Saba-COVER

Siba and Saba are young sisters who live in Uganda. Their daytime life is a little accident-prone, but at night their dreams are on a grand scale. With beautiful illustrations, this is one of the latest picture-books from Lantana Publishing, who for the last few years have been doing a fine job of expanding the global diversity of children’s books available to readers in the UK. We recommend the rest of their range too!


June 2017

Daddy Long Legs

by Nadine Brun-Cosmes

daddy long legs

Mercifully not to be confused with the Jean Webster novel, this is an enchanting story of a dad reassuring his child’s worries. I know! A capable dad! Well, it is fiction after all. With lovely illustrations by Aurélie Guillerey.


May 2017

Triangle
by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

Triangle, a plane figure with three straight sides and three angles, decides to play a sneaky trick on his friend Square (a plane figure with four equal straight sides and four right angles). Barnett and Klassen struck gold with Sam & Dave Dig a Hole and now they’ve done it again. Daft as a brush.


April 2017

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The Egg by Britta Teckentrop

Everybody loves Britta Teckentrop’s illustrations. Also, everybody loves eggs. Eggcept vegans. Here we have a sumptuous selection of different critters’ first homes. Definitely worth..shelling out for. Eggsquisite, eggciting, eggcellent!


March 2017

In this new series, discover the lives of outstanding people from designers and artists to scientists, activists and performers. All of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet all of them began life as a little child with a dream. Including fantastic illustrations and short, simple facts about incredible women throughout history. This series is perfect to celebrate and teach children about the achievements of women in a history that often forgets them.


February 2017

images-4Motor Miles by John Burningham

Goold old John Burningham. Good new John Burningham. Surely you don’t need more information than that? It’s a beautifully illustrated book about a dog who drives around in a dog-sized car made by the next-door
neighbour. I think you’ll agree it’s pretty good stuff.


January 2017

Dave’s Rock 

daves-rock-72705-3by Frann Preston-Gannon

Everybody’s favourite caveman is back with the sequel to Dave’s Cave. Dave and Jon can’t agree whose rock is the best. Delivered in the authentically crude syntax for which cavemen are renowned, this book is a delight. At the end, Dave and Jon actually seem to be…EVOLVING.


November 2016

A Year Full of Stories by Angela McAllister (illus. Christopher Corr) 5125m9pos7l

This book is designed to take young readers through the year with a selection of folk tales from all around the world. To give you an example, St Swithin’s day is marked here by the African Bushman story of Elephant and the Rain Spirit!

we-found-a-hatWe Found a Hat by Jan Klassen

The hat sequence (“I Want My Hat Back, This Is Not My Hat”) moves to its lyrical conclusion here with two very sleepy turtles contemplating the eternal difficulty of sharing…a hat. A millennial millinery reptile reverie.

“Simple language and deceptively simple illustrations make this the kind of bedtime story that children will return to again and again.” The Irish Times

Time Now to Dream by Timothy Knapman (illus. Helen Oxenbury)619yyuyfsvl

What is it with forests? It’s almost as if they are the repository of our deepest primal fears..or something. Here a brother and sister go down to the woods (today, you’re sure of a big surprise) in pursuit of a dimly-heard song. As always, Helen Oxenbury’s illustrations are absolutely lovely.


October 2016

51nnz8-ovelOdd and the Frost Giants by Neil Gaiman

Magic! Legend! Adventure! Bears! Giants! Thor! What more could you want in a book? This tale from the masterly Gaiman has been out before, but not like this: the new edition is spectacularly enriched by Chris Riddell’s fantastical illustrations to produce a new and thrilling reading experience.

Bake Me a Story by Nadiya 61tkueemvylHussain

Make yummy butter-bean patties and while they are in the oven, enjoy the story of Jack and the Bean-Patty Stalk or bake some pumpkin and spice flapjacks, then curl up with the tale of Cinderella and her pumpkins!

National Treasure Nadiya Hussain proves her worth here (that’s enough baking verbs). This book is a wonderful mixture of funny stories and tempting recipes – but best of all are the illustrations, which are hilarious and captivating.


516fg3nhhalAda’s Ideas
by Fiona Robinson

A graphic novel for children about the world’s first computer programmer? Why not? Ada Lovelace still deserves to be better known, and this could be just the book to do it. Fiona Robinson’s illustrations are perfectly judged. And I even understood some of the mathematical logic behind what Ada was doing. Well, a bit. Nearly.


September 2016

Tale of Kitty-in-Boots written by Beatrix Potter. Illustrated by Quentin Blake Beatrix Potter The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots

What happened to Peter Rabbit in later life? We’ve all wondered at some point. The question is answered here, though that’s not the main element in this surprising late arrival: a new Beatrix Potter book- undiscovered for the last hundred years! Beautifully illustrated by Quentin Blake, this is a worthy addition to the Potter canon: a sly tale of mistaken identities, devious villains and rather fancy footwear.

This Book Thinks You’re a Scientist by

The Science Museum, LondonThis Books Thinks You're a Scientist

How would you make a book fly? What would a magnetic dog be like? These are among the challenging questions presented by this book, which aims to encourage young readers to investigate their surroundings in new ways.

  Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome

Swallows and Amazons

You’d have to be a DUFFER not to love this classic story, re-issued to accompany a new film version. Four kids on a sailing trip (yep, insert Health and Safety comment here) enjoy a summer of adventure and excitement. Lord of the Flies could have been like this, if there had been any girls.


August 2016

beautiful oopsBeautiful Oops by Barney Saltzburg

Every mistake can lead to a beautiful new adventure: That s the lovely life lesson behind this inspiring board book full of pop-ups, pull-the-flaps, and pretty amazing not to mention surprising feats of paper engineering.

goodnightGoodnight Everyone by Chris Haughton

From the multi award-winning picture book maker of A Bit Lost, Oh No, George! and Shh! We Have a Plan, comes the ultimate bedtime book.

A series of exquisitely coloured cut pages of increasing size introduce woodland families – bears, deer, rabbits and teeny, tiny mice – who are all beginning to feel really … rather … tired … YAWN! “Dear me,” says Great Big Bear, “it must be time for bed!” But Little Bear is certainly not sleepy – he’s wide awake! (For now…) With sublime, starry night time scenes and an infectious yawny “Good night” refrain, Chris Haughton creates a lulling bedtime read, perfect for parents and children to share together.

NeverwhereNeverwhere by Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman’s extraordinary modern classic, illustrated for the first time by Children’s Laureate Chris Riddell. This beautiful edition is like no other, featuring the fully illustrated short story, HOW THE MARQUIS GOT HIS COAT BACK, and will delight fans of Coraline, Philip Pullman and Doctor Who.

Under the streets of London lies a world most people could never dream of.

When Richard Mayhew helps a mysterious girl he finds bleeding on the pavement, his boring life changes in an instant. Her name is Door, she’s on the run from two assassins in black suits and she comes from London Below.

His act of kindness leads him to a place filled with monsters and angels, a Beast in a labyrinth and an Earl who holds Court in a Tube train.

It is strangely familiar yet utterly bizarre.


July 2016

Colin and leeColin and Lee, Carrot and Pea by Morag Hood

Lee is a pea. All of his friends are peas; except Colin. Colin isn’t a pea.

And so begins the deliciously funny story of two very different friends: a small green pea and a tall orange carrot stick. Colin the carrot can’t do everything the peas can, but he has some special carrot-y qualities that make him a very good friend to have.

All about the beauty of making friends with people (or vegetables) who are different from you, boys and girls alike will love Colin and Lee’s clear shapes, bright colours and the playful approach to everyday objects that make this book an instant favourite.

Made using just a collage of supermarket plastic bags and painted facial expressions, Morag Hood has created a timeless picture book with unique and engaging artwork that is brimming with warmth and humour. With the bold simplicity of Herve Tullet or Dick Bruna’s Miffy, and a dry wit and charm all of Morag’s own, it is a fantastically funny story that appeals to the very youngest child – and makes adults laugh out loud.

Colin and Lee, Carrot and Pea is a brilliant debut from Morag Hood, runner-up in The Macmillan Prize for Illustration.

detective dogThe Detective Dog by Julia Donaldson and Sara Ogilvie

Peter’s dog Nell has an amazing sense of smell. Whether it’s finding a lost shoe or discovering who did a poo on the new gravel path, her ever-sniffing nose is always hard at work. But Nell has other talents too. Every Monday she goes to school with Peter and listens to children read. So who better to have on hand when they arrive one morning to discover that the school’s books have all disappeared! Who could have taken them? And why? There’s only one dog for the job … and Detective Dog Nell is ready to sniff out the culprit!

Written by the brilliant Julia Donaldson and stunningly illustrated by the multi-talented illustrator and printmaker Sara Ogilvie, Detective Dog is a fast-paced celebration of books, reading, libraries, and the relationship between a little boy and his rather special dog.

do not wash this bearDo Not Wash This Bear by Sam Hay and Nick East

Toy Story meets Gremlins in this hilarious, rhythmic family caper where Daddy ignores a washing label and Bear comes alive!

Bear has a very clear label sewn under his bottom. It says Do not wash this bear! But when Daddy puts him through a spin cycle anyway, a very naughty Bear comes out – one who causes mischief and mayhem all around the house! Father and son need Mummy to come home and save the day, but will she be back in time to show Bear who’s boss before it’s too late?

With brightly coloured and exciting artwork from the illustrator of the Goodnight series, this is an action-packed story with rhythmic, funny text perfect for reading aloud to boys and girls who love their teddies and a little bit of mischief.


June 2016

Girl of Ink etcThe Girl of Ink and Stars by Kiran Millwood Hargrave

Forbidden to leave her island, Isabella dreams of the faraway lands her cartographer father once mapped. When her friend disappears, she volunteers to guide the search. The world beyond the walls is a monster-filled wasteland – and beneath the dry rivers and smoking mountains, a fire demon is stirring from its sleep. Soon, following her map, her heart and an ancient myth, Isabella discovers the true end of her journey: to save the island itself.

roald dahlOxford Roald Dahl Dictionary

A new unique Roald Dahl Dictionary from Oxford. This is not an ordinary dictionary. After all, you wouldn’t expect an ‘Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary’ to be ordinary, would you? Lots of dictionaries tell you what an ‘alligator’ is, or how to spell ‘balloon’ but they won’t explain the difference between a ‘ringbeller’ and a ‘trogglehumper’, or say why witches need ‘gruntles’ eggs’ or suggest a word for the shape of a ‘Knid’. This dictionary does all those things. All the words that Roald Dahl invented are here, like ‘biffsquiggled’ and ‘whizzpopping’ to remind you what means what, but that is not all. You’ll also find out where words came from, rhyming words, synonyms and lots of alternative words for words that are overused. Oxford Children’s Dictionaries are perfect for supporting literacy and learning and this is the world’s first Roald Dahl Dictionary from the word experts at Oxford University Press. With real citations from Roald Dahl’s children’s books and illustrations by Quentin Blake, this is authoritative, engaging and accessible and will inspire and encourage young writers and readers.

memory treeThe Memory Tree by Britta Teckentrup

Fox has lived a long and happy life in the forest. One day, he lies down in his favourite clearing, takes a deep breath, and falls asleep for ever.

Before long, Fox’s friends begin to gather in the clearing. One by one, they tell stories of the special moments that they shared with Fox. And, as they share their memories, a tree begins to grow, becoming bigger and stronger, sheltering and protecting all the animals in the forest, just as Fox did when he was alive.

This gentle and comforting tale celebrates life and the memories that are left behind when a loved one die


MAy 2016

Dave's CaveDave’s Cave by Fran Preston-Gannon

Dave loves his cave. Inside is decorated EXACTLY the way he likes it. Outside there is a lovely spot for a fire and the grass is always lovely and green. But, Dave is unhappy. What if there might be an even better cave out there? And off he sets in search of a new home. But it turns out that good caves are hard to find. They’re either too small, or too big, or too full of bats, until he finds one that looks MUCH more promising. Outside has the perfect space for a fire and the grass is greener than any he’s ever seen …But why does it look so familiar?Stand-out new picture book from Frann Preston-Gannon, the first UK recipient of the Sendak Fellowship and author of The Journey Home, shortlisted for the Kate Greenaway 2014 and Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize. A stylish, witty picture book with a heart-warming message – sometimes you have to find out for yourself that there really is no place like home. The text, written in caveman language, is laugh-out-loud funny and perfect for reading aloud!

BeforeBefore I Wake Up by Britta Teckentrup

A young girl falls asleep and travels in her dreams through the sky, down to the ocean’s depths and into a jungle. She is accompanied by a lion friend, who eases her fears, gives her confidence and helps her explore the world around her. Along the way she meets whales, jellyfish, grizzly bears and wolves. Then it is time for the moon balloon to take the girl home to her bed, where she awakes, snuggled safely next to the lion, who returns to being a stuffed toy. Award-winning children’s illustrator Britta Teckentrup’s collage-like artwork creates a magical world of captivating colours, classic shapes and softly detailed textures. The gently told story reassures children that they are never alone, even in their dreams. Exquisitely produced, this book is certain to become a bedtime favourite for children and their parents.

nestThe Nest by Kenneth Oppel

For some kids summer is a sun-soaked season of fun. But for Steve, it s just another season of worries. Worries about his sick newborn baby brother who is fighting to survive, worries about his parents who are struggling to cope, even worries about the wasp s nest looming ominously from the eaves. So when a mysterious wasp queen invades his dreams, offering to fix the baby, Steve thinks his prayers have been answered.
All he has to do is say Yes. But yes is a powerful word. It is also a dangerous one. And once it is uttered, can it be taken back?
Celebrated author Kenneth Oppel creates an eerie masterpiece in this compelling story that explores disability and diversity, fears and dreams, and what ultimately makes a family. Includes illustrations from celebrated artist Jon Klassen.


April 2016

Young Adult

Am I normal yetAm I Normal Yet? by Holly Bourne

Shortlisted for the YA Book Prize 2016.

All Evie wants is to be normal. And now that she’s almost off her meds and at a new college where no one knows her as the-girl-who-went-nuts, there’s only one thing left to tick off her list…

But relationships can mess with anyone’s head – something Evie’s new friends Amber and Lottie know only too well. The trouble is, if Evie won’t tell them her secrets, how can they stop her making a huge mistake?

icarus showThe Icarus Show by Sally Christie

Alex has worked out a foolproof way to avoid being picked on. Don’t React. It’s so simple, it’s brilliant! David does react and becomes an outcast, nicknamed Bogsy. He’s branded a weirdo and Alex is determined to avoid the same fate. But one day, Alex gets a note in his bag that forces him out of his safe little world. Who sent the note? And is it true – will a boy really fly? A powerful story about friendship, loneliness and a strange kind of genius.


8-11

kingdom and caveThe Kingdom and the Cave by Joan Aiken

‘The Under People. They live in a huge Cave. They are thought to be boring upwards. Giant worms and flying ants. Underground magic.’

Mickle, the palace cat, knows the kingdom is in danger. He can feel it in his whiskers and he has found a mysterious note in the royal library… (Yes, of course he can read, and speak – if he chooses to!) Mickle can’t trust the King and Queen with his mission, so he and Prince Michael, with the help of their animal friends (and quite a bit of magic!), set out on a perilous quest to find the sinister Under People, discover their secret power and save the Kingdom of Astalon.

In her first novel, written when she was only a teenager, Joan Aiken showcases the imagination, wit and storytelling zest that would lead to classics like Arabel’s Raven and The Wolves of Willoughby Chase.

Beetle-Boy-websiteBeetle Boy by M.G. Leonard

Darkus is miserable. His dad has disappeared, and now he is living next door to the most disgusting neighbours ever. A giant beetle called Baxter comes to his rescue. But can the two solve the mystery of his dad’s disappearance, especially when links emerge to cruel Lucretia Cutter and her penchant for beetle jewellery? A coffee-mug mountain, home to a million insects, could provide the answer – if Darkus and Baxter are brave enough to find it.


Picture Books

RainRain by Sam Usher

Sam wants to go out but it’s pouring with rain, so he and Grandpa decide to stay inside until the rain stops. Sam drinks hot chocolate and reads his books and dreams of adventures while Grandpa gets on with his important paperwork. Grandpa seems to have a VERY important letter to write. Then that very important letter has to be posted, despite the rain and floods. As they finally go outside, Sam and Grandpa have a magical adventure. Rain is the follow-up to the acclaimed Snow; and is the second title in a four-book series based on the weather.

StuckStuck by Oliver Jeffers

Delightful chaos ensues when a young boy gets his kite stuck in a tree in this laugh-out-loud new picture book from award-winning, internationally best-selling author-illustrator Oliver Jeffers!

Floyd gets his kite stuck up a tree. He throws up his shoe to shift it, but that gets stuck too. So he throws up his other shoe and that gets stuck, along with… a ladder, a pot of paint, the kitchen sink, an orang-utan and a whale, amongst other things!

Will Floyd ever get his kite back?

A hilarious book with a wonderful surprise ending.


February 2016

Albie BrightThe Many Worlds of Albie Bright by Christopher Edge

When Albie’s mum dies, it’s natural he should wonder where she’s gone. His parents are both scientists and they usually have all the answers. Dad mutters something about Albie’s mum being alive and with them in a parallel universe. So Albie finds a box, his mum’s computer and a rotting banana, and sends himself through time and space to find her…

‘A big book with a big brain, big laughs and a big, big heart’ – Frank Cottrell Boyce

‘Hilarious and full of heart’ – Piers Torday

‘Proves the theory that novels about science can be enormous fun’ – The Times

The Lie Tree by Francis HardingeLie Tree

The Lie Tree is a wonderfully evocative and atmospheric novel by Frances Hardinge, award-winning author of Cuckoo Song and Fly By Night.

Faith’s father has been found dead under mysterious circumstances, and as she is searching through his belongings for clues she discovers a strange tree. The tree only grows healthy and bears fruit if you whisper a lie to it. The fruit of the tree, when eaten, will deliver a hidden truth to the person who consumes it. The bigger the lie, the more people who believe it, the bigger the truth that is uncovered.

The girl realizes that she is good at lying and that the tree might hold the key to her father’s murder, so she begins to spread untruths far and wide across her small island community. But as her tales spiral out of control, she discovers that where lies seduce, truths shatter…

LungdonLungdon by Edward Carey

The dirt town of Foulsham has been destroyed, its ashes still smoldering. Darkness lies heavily over the city, the sun has not come up for days. Inside the houses throughout the capital, ordinary objects have begun to move. Strange new people run through the darkened streets. There are rumours of a terrible contagion. From the richest mansion to the poorest slum people have disappeared. The police have been instructed to carry arms. And rats, there are rats everywhere.

Someone has stolen a certain plug.
Someone is lighting a certain box of matches.
All will come tumbling down.

The Iremongers have come to London.

January 2016

How Machines Work — David Macaulay

How Machines WorkDavid Macaulay’s How Machines Work uses pop-ups and award-winning illustrations to demonstrate the technology of six simple machines.

Follow the mad antics of Sloth and his side-kick Sengi as they try to break out of the zoo with the help of levers, pulleys, screws, inclined planes, wedges and wheels. Brought to life through pop-ups and pull-outs meaning you can explore six simple machines, from bicycles and cranes to hammers and drills, through interactive science. Packed with engaging, hands-on activities, David Macaulay’s How Machines Work will gear kids up for scientific and engineering greatness!

Imaginary Fred — Eoin Colfer and Oliver Jeffers

Imaginary FredAn extraordinary collaboration between Irish Children’s Laureate, Eoin Colfer, and picture book superstar, Oliver Jeffers.

Sometimes, with a little electricity, or luck, or even magic, an imaginary friend might appear when you need one. An imaginary friend like Fred…

Fred floated like a feather in the wind until a lonely little boy wished for him and found a friendship like no other.

The perfect chemistry between Eoin Colfer’s text and Oliver Jeffer’s artwork make for a dazzlingly original colour gift book.

In the Land of the Giants: Selected Children’s Poems 

— George Szirtes

In the Land ofWinner of the CLPE Poetry Award George Szirtes’ children’s poems comprise riddles, mysteries and parables, strange encounters, cautionary tales, and meditations on just about everything under the sun – from the sea’s hands to the wind’s face. All Szirtes’ technical virtuosity is on display, the music, rhyme and cadence fusing together with an Eastern European sensibility to provide a unique collection that will be treasured by all children and not a few adults. This generous new selection displays wit and warm good humour with a hint of the absurd. Also included are a series of translations of children’s poems from Hungary including works by Sandor Weores and Zoltan Zelk.

A Song for Ella Grey — David Almond

Winner of the Guardian Children’s Book Prize 2015A Song For Ella Grey

I’m the one who’s left behind. I’m the one to tell the tale. I knew them both… knew how they lived and how they died.

Claire is Ella Grey’s best friend. She’s there when the whirlwind arrives on the scene: catapulted into a North East landscape of gutted shipyards; of high arched bridges and ancient collapsed mines. She witnesses a love so dramatic it is as if her best friend has been captured and taken from her. But the loss of her friend to the arms of Orpheus is nothing compared to the loss she feels when Ella is taken from the world. This is her story – as she bears witness to a love so complete; so sure, that not even death can prove final.


way back homeThe Way Back Home – Oliver Jeffers

Zoom into space on an exciting adventure in this toddler-friendly board book from the award-winning, bestselling creator of How to Catch a Star and Lost and Found. One day a boy finds an aeroplane in his cupboard. Up, up and away he flies, past clouds and stars until suddenly, phut, phut phut, the plane runs out of petrol and the boy crash lands on the moon. Just as he is beginning to get cold and lonely, a Martian appears from the darkness – could this be the start of an unlikely friendship? And will the boy ever manage to get home again?

oh no georgeOh No, George! – Chris Haughton

Harris is off to do some shopping. “Will you be good, George?” he asks. George hopes he can. He really wants to …but chocolate cake is just so very delicious and he does love to chase cat…What will George do now? Chris Haughton’s distinctive artwork perfectly accompanies the innocent charm of affable George, a dog trying to be good – with hilarious results!

lie treeThe Lie Tree – Frances Hardinge

The Lie Tree is a wonderfully evocative and atmospheric novel by Frances Hardinge, award-winning author of Cuckoo Song and Fly By Night. Faith’s father has been found dead under mysterious circumstances, and as she is searching through his belongings for clues she discovers a strange tree. The tree only grows healthy and bears fruit if you whisper a lie to it. The fruit of the tree, when eaten, will deliver a hidden truth to the person who consumes it. The bigger the lie, the more people who believe it, the bigger the truth that is uncovered. The girl realizes that she is good at lying and that the tree might hold the key to her father’s murder, so she begins to spread untruths far and wide across her small island community. But as her tales spiral out of control, she discovers that where lies seduce, truths shatter …


shapesSHAPES – Xavier Deneux

SHAPES offers simple raised die-cut shapes on a left-hand page mirrored in the scooped-out forms of the right: the clean beauty of a white full-moon paired with the adorable owl that perches nearby. Simultaneously bold and exquisite.

This is a wonderfully tactile book: one we are very fond of indeed.

spots and stripesSpots and Stripes: Pop-Up Paper Animals – David Pelham

A beautiful little book containing seven animals with spots or stripes, and one with both. Suitable for toddlers and older this a lovely way to learn about patterns and animals, as well as a lovely and remarkably engineered object in itself.

The Table That Ran Away to the WoodsThe Table That Ran Away To The Woods – Stefan and Franciszka Themerson

The Table that Ran Away to the Woods tells the tale of a writing desk that one day ‘grabbed two pairs of shoes/ran downstairs, and took flight’, escaping into the countryside with its owners in barefoot pursuit. This is the first time the story – first published in a Polish newspaper in 1940 and recreated in this exquisite collaged version in 1963 – has been made available to an English-speaking audience. Franciszka and Stefan Themerson were Polish avant-garde artists and filmmakers who arrived as refugees in London, she in 1940, he in 1942, and who continued to work on a huge range of creative projects in England. With her unique illustrations, and his deceptively simple, humorous stories, they created many successful children’s books together.

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